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and the great government consulting as they pick the products to bring a lot of innovation to san francisco. cory? give cory a round of applause. [applause] >> thank you, chris. thank you so much for all of your hard work, chris. none of this could be possible without your efforts. good evening. the good government awards are incredibly important in san francisco. it's a chance for us to honor the tremendous work that happens in the city and also to honor the individuals who are responsible for some of that success. congratulations to all of our honorees. we're very grateful for your work. let's give a hand for them. [applause] the good government awards also support spur's good government work. it is a central part of our mission. our agenda is admittedly ambitious. we analyze every local measure on the san francisco ballot, which until recently was a pretty formidable task. we participate in most of the major issues of city government from pension and payroll tax reform to some of the most important discussions on how we fund a lot of our public services, whether that finding different re
in the 1.0 world. it was a company that created technology to connect citizens better with government * . i ran it for almost nine years. and when i was elected to office four years ago, i was unfortunately more surprised than i wanted to be about how far behind san francisco government was. this was very 2008, 2009. with you i'm really proud of the leaps and bounds we have taken as a city * . i was proud in 2010 to help move forward legislation to really bring together city departments to work in a coordinated way with our committee on information technology. to help create a chief information officer position for the city. i was also proud to work with then mayor newsome in passing the first generation of open data legislation that we have. but as our civil grand jury in june pointed out, our i-t in san francisco is still in need of a culture shock. and this is where all of us come in today. we have 200 data sets that have already been put out there, but by and large the data sets put out by city government are data sets that i think show us in a very positive way. from my perspective, it
to the public, we could really allow them to help us create even more efficient government, along with some very good entrepreneurial efforts that are reflected in today's announcements and some of our partners that are here today. so, three years later, after announcing this and after doing the first generation of open data legislation, open sf is still a very vigorous, and we want to do even more. we've teamed up again with board president david chiu who has been personally involved with this and helping us and guide us with his knowledge, having been a small business owner himself, with how we can do even better. and today we are announcing actually two areas of improvements to our piece of legislation that i think will get people even more excited. the first is after a couple of years of opening up some of the data streams in our city and seeing how this data had already started, some companies, some entrepreneurs develop applications, helped us already with identifying some additional needs in the city and involving more people, we want to do even more along that line. and, so, this legisla
based on life expectancy. for that we're using a lot of data from the u.s. government, cdc, another company called practice fusion and electronic medical record vendor. and again, what we try to do is make health fun and make the experience of health about exploring this great city that we're in and then showing the long-term health benefits of doing so. right now we're looking for beta users in the city and we'll launch in about a month or two. thank you very much. we're really happy to be here. (applause) >> cool, we're going to do a short panel talking about the state of open data and sort of what specifically some of these companies are doing which you've gotten a brief peek on. again, you're probably familiar with, already know who a lot of these people are. really quick go down and have everyone introduce them self. >> hello,ishv. my name is ian kalen, hottved by the department of energy and i support thuous us chief technology officer todd park who is not the cto, but assistant to the president. >> and i'm peter hirschberg, run publicly a dozen hack-a-thon, [speaker not under
and the fact that we have risen to the governance of this country. the fact that we have changed the opportunity. last night, i have the opportunity to listen to an 86- year-old honoree at the gathering last night. she's had spoken about how her life was different and the opportunities that were denied because she was jewish. because of the efforts of norm and mike and your leade in, asiy are not denied opportunities because of where they come from. we are aspiring and we are leaving california and america in a new generation. -- leading california and america in a new generation. we have an obligation to lead in the 21st century. we are providing leadership in all areas that govern this country. technology, health, academia, commerce, art, entertainment, and government. today, we must come together, not only in celebration, but an acknowledgment of the work that lies ahead. we understand that this is a global economy. the opportunities are ones that we can only surpassed if we come together. we can win the future if we dream together, if we work together. as a society, as an eco
start doing law enforcement when the government declared catastrophe and the president gave us the authority to do that. so we move the army inland, next the navy in the coastal communities and in san feir fernandes island and doing an airlift to the most affected area. sanfernandes island is a very small island, only a thousand people living there, but it was completely destroyed. that's what we found when we arriving there, debris everywhere, and as you can see that was the port and the square before, and that was after. so the change is, it's quite impressive. the same was a local pier and a school. that was a school. nothing. so we put in the navy, the navy put them in there two, three combat ships, type 23's and l ship and transport plus mtaa aircraft transport, aircraft and hell helicopters to try to help people in there. we used the ships to deliver food, clothes and all that stuff without any problem. also we helped in different matters that the navy can do that. for instance here was with divers and with submarine robot to find bodies. getting medical assistance,
more memories i want to share. one deals with government and jazz. chris always wanted to work for the state department. he always wanted to be involved in the foreign service. he took the foreign service exam when we were undergrads at cal. he came back the first time, pleased with results on the written but felt he didn't do so well on the orals. the question that seemed to trip him up and left him perplexed was the following. mr. stevens, please compare american government and jazz music. chris told us he didn't quite know how to handle that question. my suggestion involved people blowing loudly on their horns or banging loud' on their drums was not terribly helpful. we decided to ask questions to trip up the applicant. we didn't have the internet to find a quick answer but figured it out. though chris may not have come up with the answer during that exam he certainly lived the message taught by this interesting comparison. both american democracy and jazz music involved ongoing experimentation. they involve unscripted action and improvisation as we figure out the best way t
investments were frequently subsidized by the federal government, water pricing was often calculated without accounting for the initial cost to build the systems. we made major investments in assets in the '50s, '60s, and '70s. and for the first 40 years of that pipe, there really may not have been many maintenance requirements. we're past that period now. narrator: water pricing based only on day-to-day operation, and not on planning for maintenance and eventual upgrades has resulted in a considerable repair and replacement backlog. allbee: on a national scale, if you looked at what we're spending now, and you looked at the additional investment requirements over the next 20 years, there's a $540 billion difference. man: so one of the greatest challenges is to reflect true value pricing. so that the citizens and businesses that rely on water and wastewater infrastructure systems are actually paying for it. narrator: cities and municipalities across the united states are now facing this funding gap, between projected revenue and projected expenses, as they strive to maintain water quality an
other question about what is the federal government doing, we're seeking not just an energy, but across the government to engage entrepreneurs and innovators across all the different sectors. for those of you familiar with the history of the health data initiative launched by then the hhs health and human services chief technology officer todd park, we sought to have a health data palooza proceeded by health data jambs or modeling sessions, jams sounded more fun, we can invite entrepreneurs in and see what can be done and created real products within a few months. that is being rolled out at education, energy, treasury, u.s. aid, other agencies as well. these programs are celebrating the use of open data and hopefully will provide some additional support. i think there are even folks here who have been part of these events. we're excited for that continued support and hope you can all join this initiative in the neutral. -- future. >> so, earlier you were talking a little about kind of how san francisco came in in terms of actually ading the officer. more broadly how do you think san fr
departments like san francisco arts, we're creating access for people, creating efficiency with the government being able to manage transactions, creating a platform for people to actually interact with the city on a level that hasn't been done before. so, ideally, using the san francisco rec and park, the future san francisco arts app, using our mobile commerce to manage that is creating jobs, revenue, and efficiency for the public and tourists to be able to navigate san francisco in a way that hasn't been done before. thank you. >> all right. (applause) >> so, we're going to show another application from motion launch, the founder and ceo, john, will be sharing some of the work that they're doing. they're based here out of san francisco and they've got a great announcement to make. >> i am jon mills. i'm ceo of motion loft. we started about three years ago developing sensors that we could place around cities that would give us some analytics on how people move around cities and how vehicles drive around cities. so, currently we have 16 neighborhoods -- 18 neighborhoods covered in san francis
to welcome the community into city hall - because you remind us our purpose in government so to serve and you you certainly bring life and culture and community into our very state halls and bring life to us, so thank you again. i want to thank the nominating committee and the planning committee for their excellent work in ensuring that those very important community members who do so much to ensure that our communities remain strong and vibrant, those who are under served typically continue to be served that our communities are strengthened and our ties are bound and strong. so, in 2012, of this year, we are very lucky enough to have two very distinguished honorees for our distinguished service a word for the city and county of san francisco and the first person we will recognize tonight is vera noon tear if you can please u.s.a. plast she is the social director at the arab culture and community center and she helps hundreds of families in trans by providing social work service and is i know how important that work is and how difficult that work is and i can't thank you enough to ensure t
libyans were amazed at the site of a senior government official doing mundane activities without a huge entourage and demanding vip treatment. chris had a great knowledge of libyan history and culture. he would often crack jokes with government counter parts. not just in arabic but in the libyan dialect, which the libyans loved to hear him speak. another told me when i saw him in may as newly appointed ambassador in tripoli he had not changed, despite the promotion and accolades. he was the same guy. lingering one night after dinner to help me with a difficult table, i referred to him as sir or ambassador. he looked at me for a second, he sighs and he said i wish everyone would just call me chris. he loved the work, loved the people, but he never took himself too seriously. people talk about what a good diplomat he was. he knew how to motivate others to be the same. even those down on their careers, lost faith, in hardship. this was a tough task to inspire other to serve with dignity and self-respect. chris knew how to do that. nothing we can say here can make up for the heart ache and
of the choice that was made to put in combined sewer systems. narrator: in 1994, the government adopted a combined sewer overflow policy to reduce csos nationwide. cities with combined sewer overflows now face an enforcement action called a consent decree. under a consent decree, a city must reduce pollution levels significantly within a strict time frame or face heavy fines. in 1960, the combined sewer overflows were a perfectly legitimate way of dealing with sewers. woman: the mind set was that, what did it matter if we were sending our waste downstream? water was a good conveyance for pollution. man: sewer systems are installed to reduce public health problems. now what you're doing is transferring the problem, you're transferring it to downstream cities. in addition, cities and towns above pittsburgh were doing the same thing. and then they were affecting the water intakes of pittsburgh. 90% of this region gets its drinking water from those same rivers that we have overflows occurring. hecht: we have sewage overflow with as little as 1/10" inch of rain. and our average storm here is
substantially more, on the federal government side, as an inducement to states and local governments to make the investments they need to make. man: but the federal role is going to continue to be diminished because of so many competing demands. so the expectation that the federal government will step in and infuse a lot of capital into water infrastructure, i think, is doubtful. and whether they should or not, i think, will continue to be debated. narrator: where money continues to be elusive, some cities and towns are turning their assets over to private companies, hoping the private sector can find the solutions they cannot. man: in the u.s., roughly 90% of all water and wastewater systems are still publicly owned and publicly managed. the remaining 10% are managed by privately held companies. man: the private sector has learned to become very efficient, and frequently a municipality can save themselves a significant amount of money by bringing in a private company. this is not true in all cases. there are some exceptionally well-run municipalities, but they do have to deal with a city go
'll see happening as well, government starts to become smarter, make better decisions, better policies. this term algorithmic regulation, which means you can have laws and policies in the cities determined by data and not just what we think is best, but what's actually best. so, as cities keep catching on and more and more with the data, you're going to see some really interesting things coming out. >> cool. while we're talking about data, another part of the announcement today was also motion loft making private data available within sort of that initiative and that website wrieri'd like to hear a little more, john, about kind of deciding to share that data with the city and also a lot of times especially with other companies you see them being very protective of their data. there is a lot of value there. how do you sort of balance, protecting the value of your data and commercial viability versus making it available to the public? >> so, we have a unique problem, i think, to a lot of start-ups in the fact that we have a product that we sell and a lot of different vertical. we also ha
and local government. when i think about the hate crimes cases and the other cases i've done, i've made friends for life with local law enforcement officers, with local da's and local community leaders who have been our eyes and ears. when i look around this audience i really appreciate the fact you have all the ingredients of reform and improvement. i have had the privilege of serving in the federal government, as melinda described, i've had the privilege of serving in state government as a state cabinet official back in maryland, i've had the privilege of serving as a local elected official and governor -- once a local elected official, always a local elected official. what i learned from that is partnership is what it's all about. if you want to confront the most vexing problems, you have to bring people across an ideological spectrum, you have to include the business community, you have to include our nonprofit, our faith leaders. that's how you get things done, when you bring people together. and i look around this room and i see that you have already figured that out. i hope
, the u.s. department of state, danish and british governments and of course the afghans, additionally we reached out to the private sector for partnerships, and not for profits to deliver things that we weren't capable of delivering or to cover gaps that arose as we implemented the plan. we implemented the plan through 17 teams through helman and our two female engagement teams. this is actually just scrolling pictures. sometimes a picture says a thousand words and i don't want to take you down the whole history of a year but i wanted to talk to you about how we framed this plan. this plan was framed into 5 pillars and the 5 pillars were students and parents, we attempted to build buy in and assure safety among the students. there was lots of fear of reprisals. by sending your kids to school there was fear that the taliban was going to knock on your door and let you know that that wasn't allowed. previously the taliban had instituted a medrossas so their only forms of education were religious schools and those are religious schools for boys. teachers. there is no teaching force in
to work with, with government officials and others, how do we get to the facilities to fix them. in terms of an emergency response stand point, we have stand by back ups, we have stand by centers, we can operate an emergency center in san francisco out of walnut creek, out of san ramon, almost anywhere in the state if we choose to. in terms of working with local governments, we are members of many state, federal and local emergency response organizations. again we're a regional company so it's not just about one general location, it's about serving every one of our local service areas whether it's san francisco or the san joaquin valley. >> thank you, mr. boland. >> we fill a little different role. we don't have any infrastructure but we represent utilities that have 88 percent of the infrastructure that keep our populations running. we cover from the mexican border to oregon and what we facilitate through the organization is we are embedded with the state of california through the last 60 years. we are in the cali complex, we have an mou with the secretary of cali and can bring resou
for all school students, the role of our federal government. tom perez, assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. she was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secret
pensions and working hard on economic development and job retention. he is making city government more responsive and efficient and making public safety a top priority. mayor lee is a long time public servant. prior to becoming mayor, he served as city administrator where he focused on government efficiency and measures and reforms that reduced the size and cost of government. mayor lee first began working for the city and county of san francisco in 1989 as the investigator for the city's first whistle blower program. prior to employment with the city and county of san francisco, he was the managing attorney for the asian law caucus. i first met ed in 1992 when he became the executive director for the human rights commission and we were both 16. that's two decades ago, ed. i watched him soon become the director of city purchasing and then going on to become the director of public works. i think ed is the only mayor in city history that can carry tlau on the campaign promise to fill the potholes because he actually knows how and he's the only mayor in city history that can say he
in the bay area when the assassinations happened, and wanted to be part of a government that was going to be much more open. in fact, i had to sue the government in order to make it more open. and those years where struggle and just representing people who wanted to make the city much more equality bent was where i felt. and i feel today that if mayor moscone and harvey milk were here, they'd be pretty proud of what we've been able to accomplish in those years. seeing how mayor brown became mayor and my lucky charm of being now the first asian mayor of the city, understanding -- thank you. (applause) >> understanding now that we have the first african-american as president of the united states has now been reelected. [cheering and applauding] >> and this is in addition to all of the local regional lgbt persons that have been elected and a pointed to this wonderful city and the region. * appointed i think they would smile, that they would see that their efforts to make this city much more equitable for everybody has been already accomplished. and like supervisor wiener said, the job is
francisco government tv. the camera in front is only aimed at the podium. it is not taking shots of the audience, only the podium for people who want to ask questions. so do not worry, you are not on tv if you do not want to be. >> thank you for your patience. i am a representative with leader pelosi, and i'm thrilled to have you today to learn more of our best practices for accessing credit. it is a priority for our office. we are very well aware of how small businesses are running up against the wall right now in terms of trying to get the credit and loans they are looking for, so i will try hard to bring the brightest minds in this room so you can effectively fix their range and learn more about what you can do better to fix your business plan and what it is they are looking for. first of all, i will introduce everyone. mark quinn is the san francisco district director of the u.s. small business administration. the small business administration covers not only san francisco proper but the bay area. the severed his third district is responsible for a business loan portfolio of
which, as established, comes from the turkish government. fire fighters and things like public works are owned by the municipality. let me tell you about budget discrepancies. the fire department, i got to tell you, when i went and i met with the fire chief, that one left a mark. their fire department was red tagged but they didn't have a place because it was so cold to house their engines because you can't leave diesel engines out in the cold, just doesn't work too well, so they still had to use the facility but they housed the personnel in two tents out in front. their headquarters is one tent and their dorm is another tent and they welcomed us in there, didn't even think twice. and in the story of what it was like there, for a community of nearly 700,000 people, their complete complement of fire fighters that were on duty, their professional staff, was just over 40. they had 4 pieces of apparatus. the newest of which was over 10 years old. they kept it together literally with duct tape and baling wire and that's what they did every day. and i asked them, how was it after th
to be hosting these on a regular basis. the next two coming up will focus on becoming a government contractor, how your small business can partner with the government. the next one will also be on how to grain your business, with tax -- green your business, tax credits available with that. for non-profit, charitable organizations, we have a workshop coming up. that is helpful for those of you who are looking to access the committee on a durable basis. >> also, on behalf of leader pelosi, i want to thank our panel and her staff. we are tenants in this building. i apologize for the security situation that happened upstairs. if you have concerns about it, please come and see me. i would like to convey those to the landlord here so that it does not happen again. thank you. >> hi, everybody. my name is carmen chu. why don't we get started. with a marking up with the department of small business -- we have been working with the department of small business. this project started when we heard from neighborhood merchants. unfortunately, they had access issues, visibility access issues. we have been
with this. you know, when it comes to technology, we in the government can never do it alone. whether it is federal, state, or local government, we have got to work with our private partners so that all of the media connections can happen. i want to give a shout out to comcast, verizon, the san francisco health plan, scan health med, unlock, our media partners, and all the organizations and volunteers working along with us to help our seniors and helping our people with disabilities connect end. this launch, this summit really is to launch a new program, our sf connected program. this allows us to work with all of our seniors in as many locations throughout the city get connected up. to provide a higher level of digital literacy and broadband adoption, whether it is in our community centers, our housing authority centers, our low- income service centers alike. we are announcing today that we are going to complete with this grant 53 locations throughout the whole city. 53 of them. [applause] we have already got 28 of them set up, and by the end of the month or early next month, we will
.s. government land, san francisco land, and then you had these squatters. these were rich men who decided maybe they could make some money. >> you put up a fence and you owned the land. >> it can to a compromise. squatters get some. you have certain military things reserved, government. we will create a public park. everyone donated a certain amount to create golden gate park. they also created smaller parks. there were all part of the deal. >> a lot of people got moved closer to downtown as part of the deal. if you are out in the middle of nowhere land and had a couple of acres, they would trade you a better acres somewhere else. >> how was it decided to put it where it is? >> it was controversial. people thought they could not put a park there because it was all sand dunes. people were pushing for a large city park in other places. it was a political compromise. >> between lincoln and fulton and the beach. >> you're saying, why did they decide that exact plot? they brought someone from new york to come up with a park plan. they eventually made it a rectangle. they had the panhandle part. the
states, and the federal government which already do this and in the 13 other states, we have the data that shows that we get better results, better outcomes, meaning safer communities, and surprisingly the states include not only the large eastern states of pennsylvania and new york, but also states like mississippi, south carolina, west virginia, wyoming, iowa, all of which use this mid deem charge rather than felony. and what we find in these 13 other states is that there are higher rates of drug treatment participation, lower rates of drug use, and even slightly lower rates of violent and property crime. so again, we can prove we can have safer communities. and then of course there are the unintended consequences of a felony conviction. consequences that really can cause great damage to a young life for many decades out. the very three things that can keep someone successfully in his or her recovery, access to housing, education and employment are put farther out of reach because of a felony conviction, especially in a down economy, someone with a felony has great difficulty even a
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 134 (some duplicates have been removed)

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